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  • Editorial2024-06-30
    JAMS

    New Insights into the Acupuncture Point Microenvironment

    Sungtae Koo*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2024; 17(3): 81-82
  • Perspective Article2024-06-30
    JAMS

    The Body as an Electronic Scheme

    Oksana Strakhova*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2024; 17(3): 83-85
    Abstract

    There is no clear evidence that acupuncture points and meridians are separate organs or specific tissues. However, in traditional Chinese medicine, the mechanism of acupuncture action is associated with the vital energy concept. To identify the body’s energy source and the material basis of its transmission, transformation, and use, it is necessary to consider it as an energy-generating object, with all its components. By abstracting from the body’s usual structural view, we found that it is an autonomous energy-generating object. The human body generates energy through the lungs and digestive tract, which are electrochemical generator organs. Because the generated energy must be transferred to the consumer, the body has wire and transformer analogs. It bears an obvious resemblance with an electronic circuit, where cellular structures, tissues, and their combinations act as electrical and radioelements. The heart, brain, and muscles, which have well-known electrical parameters, as well as acupuncture points, offer information about the state of these electronic circuits. This article describes an extra-organ approach for systematizing body structures. It also attempts to represent the meridians and acupuncture points system as integral electro-radioelements, as well as the local circuit components of the whole body’s electronic scheme.

  • Research Article2024-06-30

    Evaluating Dielectric Properties for Assessing Water Content at Acupuncture Points: New Methodology

    Manoela Gallon Pitta1, Kelly Zhang1, Gustavo Henrique de Mello Rosa1, Flávia Belavenuto Rangon1, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira Guirro1, Marcelo Lourenço da Silva2, João Eduardo de Araujo1,*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2024; 17(3): 86-93
    Abstract

    Importance: Understanding acupuncture point microenvironments is vital for optimizing treatment efficacy. Evaluating changes in water content at these points can provide further insights into the effects of acupuncture on tissues.Objective: This study aimed to measure tissue dielectric constant (TDC) and assess changes in water content, specifically at stomach 36 (ST36, Zusanli) and spleen 6 (SP6, Sanyinjiao) acupuncture points.Methods: In a controlled, blinded, randomized trial, 113 healthy volunteers were divided into six groups based on TDC sensor diameters (XS, M, and L): three control groups and three acupuncture groups. They were assessed at three time points: T1, baseline; T2, 20 min post-needle withdrawal; and T3, 40 min post-needle withdrawal. Electrical impedance (EI) was also analyzed. Significance level was set at p < 0.001.Results: TDC at ST36 and SP6 significantly decreased with the XS probe at T2 and T3 compared with that at T1 (F8, 452: 54.61). TDC did not significantly vary between T2 and T3 with M and L probes. EI data indicated that the current passage increased in the SP (F2, 226: 39.32) and ST (F2, 226: 37.32) groups during T2 and T3 compared with that during T1 within their respective groups and controls.Conclusions and Relevance: This study demonstrated the efficacy of TDC measurements in detecting water content fluctuations at acupuncture points and their responses to needles. TDC measurements, which were validated against EI, provide valuable insights into acupuncture point microenvironments and thus help optimize treatments.

  • Clinical Study Protocol2024-06-30

    The Effect of Ankle Muscles Dry Needling on Brain Activity Map Based on fMRI: a Study Protocol for Randomized Controlled Trial

    Roshanak Honarpishe1, Soofia Naghdi1,*, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari1,2, Jan Dommerholt3, Marzieh Hassanabadi4
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2024; 17(3): 94-99
    Abstract

    Importance: Neuromodulation may be one of the underlying mechanisms of dry needling (DN); however, the mechanism has not yet been fully clarified.Objective: This randomized controlled trial is designed to evaluate DN stimulation of the tibialis anterior and peroneus longus muscles in chronic ankle instability (CAI) and healthy subjects, employing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).Design: Clinical study protocol, SPIRIT compliant.Setting: Brain Mapping Laboratory.Population: A total of thirty participants aged between 18 and 40 years old will be included in this study. Twenty healthy participants will be randomized into 2 groups (real DN and sham DN). Ten patients with CAI will also be recruited to the third group and receive only real DN for comparison.Exposures: Real and sham DN.Main Outcomes and Measures: The voxel count, coordinates of peak activation, and peak intensity will be obtained as primary outcomes to report brain map activation. Measurements will be taken before, during, and after DN treatment. The strength of the ankle dorsiflexors, active dorsiflexion range of motion, and McGill pain questionnaire short-form will be used as secondary outcome measures.Results: The results from this study will be published in peer-reviewed journals and disseminated as presentations at national and international congresses.Conclusion: This trial will explore brain responses to real and sham DN in healthy participants and to real DN in CAI patients. Overall, our results will provide preliminary evidence of the neural mechanism of DN.

  • Clinical Study Protocol2024-06-30

    Intraoral Acupuncture for Sialorrhea in Stroke Patients: a Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Jin-Jin Wang1,2,*, Meng-Meng Shao2, Xue-Zhen Zhou2, Zu-Chen Lin2, Hai-Yan Li2, Zheng-Zhong Yuan3, Qin-Qin Ma2, Fang Li2, Wen-Bin Fu1,4*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2024; 17(3): 100-109
    Abstract

    Background: Post-stroke sialorrhea (PSS) refers to excessive saliva flowing out of the lip border after a stroke. PSS negatively affects patient self-image and social communication and may lead to depression. Commonly used treatments for reducing salivation have various adverse effects and may be unsuitable for stroke patients. Additionally, limited evidence supports the link between excessive salivation and PSS. Intraoral tongue acupuncture is an alternative therapeutic approach for decreasing sialorrhea in children. However, no large-scale, strictly controlled randomized controlled trials have shown the effectiveness of acupuncture in treating PSS patients. We aim to compare the effects of intraoral and sham acupuncture in PSS patients and explore the relationships among salivation and drooling severity, frequency, and swallowing function in stroke patients.Methods: We will recruit 106 PSS patients for this prospective, single-center, randomized, and sham-controlled trial, randomly assigned to receive 4-week intraoral or sham acupuncture. Additionally, 53 stroke patients without PSS will undergo a conventional 4-week treatment program to compare salivation between PSS and non-PSS patients. Follow-up will be conducted for 4 weeks post-intervention. The main evaluation index will be the 3-minute saliva weight (3MSW), comparing changes in 3MSW from baseline to weeks 4 and 8. Secondary assessment indices will include the “Drooling Severity and Frequency Scale” and “Functional Oral Intake Scale.”Discussion: Comparing effects of intraoral and sham acupuncture in PSS patients, this study may contribute important evidence for future PSS treatment and provide valuable insights into whether salivation issues in stroke patients are attributed to heightened salivary secretion or dysphagia.

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Aims & Scope

The Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies is a bimonthly, peer-reviewed, open access journal featuring high-quality studies related to basic and clinical acupuncture and meridian research. of integrative biomedical research and.… + more

Journal Info

Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies
Vol.17 No.3
June, 2024

pISSN 2005-2901
eISSN 2093-8152

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    • Perspective Article2022-08-31

      Correlation Between the Sinew Channels with the Myofascial System, Pathology, and Treatment

      Pablo Nava Jaimes*, Alejandro Martínez Reyes, Daniel García Lara, Abel Cristian Patiño Coyuca
      J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 201-213 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.201

      The sinew channels are a tendon and muscle network, and their description is based on the observation presented on the Huangdi Neijing Ling Shu. However, the myofascial system is an uninterrupted series of connective tissue that is comprised of layers that run in different directions. The similarities on these pathways are compared, such as a brief description on the myofascial pain syndrome and its similitude with the Impediment disorder from the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Furthermore, we discuss the treatment of these conditions from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective.

    • Brief Report2023-12-31
      Abstract

      Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is an important public health issue in India. This study was performed to determine the impact of acupuncture at the GB39, BL17, and LR13 points on hemoglobin levels, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and red cell distribution width (RDW) in people with IDA. One hundred women with IDA were randomly allocated to the acupuncture group (AG) or placebo control group (PCG). For 30 minutes per day, daily for 2 weeks, the AG received acupuncture at GB39, BL17, and LR13, while the PCG received needling at non-acupuncture points. Outcomes were assessed before and after the intervention. We found a significant increase (p < 0.001) in hemoglobin level (AG 10.39-11.38 g/dl, effect size 0.785; PCG 10.58-10.40 g/dl, effect size 0.191), MCH (AG 25.69-27.50 fl, effect size 0.418; PCG 27.43-27.23 fl, effect size 0.058), and RDW (AG 15.12-16.41 fl, effect size 0.626; PCG 14.91-14.94 fl, effect size 0.017) in the AG compared to the PCG. Results suggest that needling at the GB39, BL17, and LR13 acupuncture points is more effective in treating people with IDA than needling at non-acupuncture points.

    • Brief Report2022-12-31
      Abstract

      A patient with bradycardia and an idioventricular rhythm was observed. According to cardiologists, there is no reliable drug treatment for bradycardia with an idioventricular rhythm; instead, the sole treatment is a pacemaker. In the course of this case, it was shown that acupuncture can restore the heart rhythm from bradycardia to normocardia, and from idioventricular with third-degree atrioventricular node block and an average heart rate of 34 BPM, to normal sinus rhythm with a heart rate of 71 BPM. Additionally, at the end of the treatment, the patient’s number of episodes of ventricular extrasystole decreased 36 times (3289 versus 91 episodes). These results show that research on this technique should be continued.

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    • Perspective Article2022-08-31

      Correlation Between the Sinew Channels with the Myofascial System, Pathology, and Treatment

      Pablo Nava Jaimes*, Alejandro Martínez Reyes, Daniel García Lara, Abel Cristian Patiño Coyuca
      J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 201-213 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.201

      The sinew channels are a tendon and muscle network, and their description is based on the observation presented on the Huangdi Neijing Ling Shu. However, the myofascial system is an uninterrupted series of connective tissue that is comprised of layers that run in different directions. The similarities on these pathways are compared, such as a brief description on the myofascial pain syndrome and its similitude with the Impediment disorder from the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Furthermore, we discuss the treatment of these conditions from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective.

    • Review Article2022-10-31

      Acupuncture for Osteoporosis: a Review of Its Clinical and Preclinical Studies

      Yimiao Tian1,†, Lili Wang2,†, Tianshu Xu1, Rui Li1, Ruyuan Zhu1, Beibei Chen1, Hao Zhang1, Bingke Xia1, Yiwen Che3, Dandan Zhao1,*, Dongwei Zhang1,*
      J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(5): 281-299 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.5.281
      Abstract

      Acupuncture has gained growing attention in the management of osteoporosis (OP). However, a comprehensive review has not yet been conducted on the efficacy and challenges of acupuncture in preliminary research and clinical trials. Therefore, an extensive literature search was conducted using electronic databases, including PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed), CNKI (www.cnki.net), and Web of Science, for studies published from the beginning of 2000 to the end of May 2022. Combinations of synonyms for OP, acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, clinical trial, preclinical study, and animal experiments were searched. A total of 290 papers were consulted, including 115 reviews, 109 clinical observations, and 66 preclinical studies. There is accumulating evidence to support the beneficial role of acupuncture in preserving bone quality and relieving clinical symptoms based on clinical and preclinical investigations. The top ten most commonly used acupoints are BL23, ST36, BL20, BL11, CV4, GV4, SP 6, KI3, BL18, and GB39. The underlying mechanisms behind the benefits of acupuncture may be linked with the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (adrenal) axis and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin and OPG/RANKL/RANK signaling pathways. In summary, strong evidence may still come from prospective and well-designed clinical trials to shed light on the potential role of acupuncture in preserving bone loss. Future investigations are needed to explore the potential underlying mechanisms, long-term clinical efficacy, and compliance of acupuncture in OP management.

    • Review Article2022-06-30

      Exploring Acupuncture Actions in the Body and Brain

      In-Seon Lee, Younbyoung Chae*
      J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(3): 157-162 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.3.157
      Abstract

      Acupuncture’s actions have been explained by biomedical research. However, the meridian system used in acupuncture needs further clarification. This review describes how acupuncture affects the body and brain. From the perspective of traditional East Asian medicine, the meridian system is closely connected with acupuncture’s treatment effects. In the body, the indications of acupoints, primarily established based on the meridian system, have spatial symptom patterns. Spatial patterns of acupoint indications are distant from the stimulated sites and strongly associated with the corresponding meridian’s route. Understanding how acupuncture works based on the original meridian system is important. From a neuroscience perspective, an acupuncture-induced sensation originates from the bottom-up action of simple needling in the peripheral receptor and the reciprocal interaction with top-down brain modulation. In the brain, enhanced bodily attention triggered by acupuncture stimulation can activate the salience network and deactivate the default mode network regardless of the actual stimulation. The application of data science technology to acupuncture research may provide new tools to uncover the principles of acupoint selection and enhance the clinical efficacy of acupuncture treatment in various diseases.

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