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  • Perspective Article2022-08-31

    Correlation Between the Sinew Channels with the Myofascial System, Pathology, and Treatment

    Pablo Nava Jaimes*, Alejandro Martínez Reyes, Daniel García Lara, Abel Cristian Patiño Coyuca
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 201-213 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.201

    The sinew channels are a tendon and muscle network, and their description is based on the observation presented on the Huangdi Neijing Ling Shu. However, the myofascial system is an uninterrupted series of connective tissue that is comprised of layers that run in different directions. The similarities on these pathways are compared, such as a brief description on the myofascial pain syndrome and its similitude with the Impediment disorder from the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Furthermore, we discuss the treatment of these conditions from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective.

  • Brief Report2023-12-31
    Abstract

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is an important public health issue in India. This study was performed to determine the impact of acupuncture at the GB39, BL17, and LR13 points on hemoglobin levels, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and red cell distribution width (RDW) in people with IDA. One hundred women with IDA were randomly allocated to the acupuncture group (AG) or placebo control group (PCG). For 30 minutes per day, daily for 2 weeks, the AG received acupuncture at GB39, BL17, and LR13, while the PCG received needling at non-acupuncture points. Outcomes were assessed before and after the intervention. We found a significant increase (p < 0.001) in hemoglobin level (AG 10.39-11.38 g/dl, effect size 0.785; PCG 10.58-10.40 g/dl, effect size 0.191), MCH (AG 25.69-27.50 fl, effect size 0.418; PCG 27.43-27.23 fl, effect size 0.058), and RDW (AG 15.12-16.41 fl, effect size 0.626; PCG 14.91-14.94 fl, effect size 0.017) in the AG compared to the PCG. Results suggest that needling at the GB39, BL17, and LR13 acupuncture points is more effective in treating people with IDA than needling at non-acupuncture points.

  • Brief Report2022-12-31
    Abstract

    A patient with bradycardia and an idioventricular rhythm was observed. According to cardiologists, there is no reliable drug treatment for bradycardia with an idioventricular rhythm; instead, the sole treatment is a pacemaker. In the course of this case, it was shown that acupuncture can restore the heart rhythm from bradycardia to normocardia, and from idioventricular with third-degree atrioventricular node block and an average heart rate of 34 BPM, to normal sinus rhythm with a heart rate of 71 BPM. Additionally, at the end of the treatment, the patient’s number of episodes of ventricular extrasystole decreased 36 times (3289 versus 91 episodes). These results show that research on this technique should be continued.

  • Research Article2022-08-31

    Effects of Acupuncture in the Treatment of Dogs with Neurological Sequels of Distemper Virus

    Bianca P. C. R. Santos1, Jean G. F. Joaquim2, Renata Navarro Cassu3,*, José C. F. Pantoja1, Stelio Pacca Loureiro Luna1
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 238-246 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.238
    Abstract

    Background: Acupuncture (AP) has been empirically used to relieve post-canine distemper virus (CDV) infection neurological signs in veterinary clinics.Objectives: This clinical study aimed to investigate the effects of AP combined with electroacupuncture (EA) on neurological function in dogs infected by CDV.Methods: Twenty-four CDV-infected dogs with neurological sequelae were recruited to receive weekly AP/EA sections for 24 weeks. Neurological improvements were assessed before each AP/EA session using a modified scoring system. Data were analyzed using the McNemar test, Friedman test, Fisher's exact test, and Kaplan-Meier curves (p < 0.05).Results: Neurological scores improved from seven to 24 weeks after AP/EA treatment compared with pretreatment scores (p < 0.001). Significant improvements were recorded over time for functional limb recovery, cranial nerve deficits, mental status (p = 0.025 – 0.014), and urinary function (p < 0.001). Myoclonus was improved and entirely reversed in 75% and 25% of the dogs, respectively. At the end of treatment, the proportion of dogs with normal proprioception, posture, hopping (p < 0.001), and superficial pain sensation responses (p = 0.004) was greater than pretreatment values.Conclusion: AP/EA therapy promoted significant neurological recovery in CDV-infected dogs and may be considered within the chronic phase of the disease to improve motor and sensory rehabilitation. However, these results are preliminary and must be confirmed by further investigations.

  • Review Article2023-12-31
    JAMS

    Acupuncture in Sports Medicine

    George G.A. Pujalte1,2,*, Michael Malone3, Akhil Mandavalli1, Davong David Phrathep4, Neil P. Shah5, Adam I. Perlman6
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(6): 239-247 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.6.239
    Abstract

    Acupuncture is gaining popularity and wider acceptance as a treatment modality within the field of sports medicine. Our objective was to provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature pertaining to acupuncture in sports medicine to shed light on approaches utilized in acupuncture while revealing its personalized nature and its impact on athletes’ preparation, performance, and recovery. We evaluated acupuncture research in the context of medicine and sports-related injury treatment, assessing its impact on athletic performance across demographics of athletes. Athletes participating in most sports have shown positive outcomes from acupuncture interventions. Acupuncture improves peak oxygen levels, maximum heart rate, delayed-onset muscle soreness, pain, swelling, explosive force production, and joint mobility. Furthermore, the efficacy of acupuncture appears to be similar regardless of age and sex. Lastly, the acceptance of acupuncture is influenced by cultural factors, with Western and traditional East Asian cultures exhibiting distinct perspectives on its rationale and mechanisms of action. Traditional East Asian acupuncturists typically employ qi and meridian theories in their acupuncture practices, with the recent incorporation of Western concepts. Acupuncture shows promise as an effective treatment for musculoskeletal pain and neuropathies in athletes across different age groups and for addressing injuries in various sports. Our comprehensive review will enhance our understanding of acupuncture’s potential as a complementary or distinct therapeutic approach compared to conventional therapies. Additionally, our review explores its specific applications within different sports and delves into the cultural dimensions involved in integrating this practice into modern sports medicine.

  • Case Report2023-04-30

    Integrative Strategy with Ayurveda and Electro-Acupuncture in Hemifacial Spasm: a Case Report

    Akshatha K Bhat1,*, Venugopalan Krishna kumar2, Jim Daniel Johnson3
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(2): 65-69 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.2.65
    Abstract

    We report a primary hemifacial spasm that started four years ago with sudden twitching of the face towards the right side. It was diagnosed as a hemifacial spasm by a neurologist and prescribed with Zeptol 100 mg 0.5 tablet BID for two weeks, followed by two sittings of Botox injection in a gap of 1 year. A year later, it reappeared more severely, driving her towards an integrative treatment modality. Ayurveda treatments including Nasya, Ksheera dhooma, internal medications, and Rasona navaneetha prayoga were administered. GV20, GB14, EX-HN5, ST3, ST4, ST6, TE17, LI4, and GB34 were selected for electro-acupuncture. The scores of hemifacial spasm grading and quality of life scale were 9 and 20 (before), 6 and 16 (after treatment), and 4 and 10 (follow-up after six months), respectively. This integrative approach was safe and has shown an improvement in hemifacial spasm.

  • Research Article2022-12-31
    Abstract

    Background: Acupuncture is a non-pharmacological therapy used clinically for mood disorders. Relief of physical symptoms with acupuncture treatment may lead to relief of depressive symptoms and improvement of quality of life (QoL). Few studies have examined the effect of acupuncture on the physical symptoms and QoL of patients with mood disorders.Objectives: To examine the effect of acupuncture on physical symptoms and QoL of patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD).Methods: This prospective, single-arm, longitudinal study included patients with MDD and BD from an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Acupuncture was performed weekly for 12 weeks in combination with regular treatment, with fixed acupoints and individualized treatment for each patient. Psychiatric symptoms were evaluated using the Himorogi Self-Rating Depression Scale (HSDS) and Himorogi Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (HSAS). Physical symptoms such as physical pain, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sleep disorders were evaluated using the Japanese version of the Somatic Symptom Scale-8 (SSS-8) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS). QoL was evaluated using the 8-item Short-Form (SF-8) Health Survey.Results: A total of 36 patients (15 MDD and 21 BD patients) were analyzed. After 12 weeks of acupuncture, HSDS and HSAS scores significantly decreased (p < 0.05). Physical symptoms evaluated using SSS-8 and VAS scores also significantly improved (p < 0.05). In particular, neck pain and insomnia improved at an early stage. Among the SF-8 subscales, scores of bodily pain, general health perception, role limitations due to emotional problems, and mental health significantly increased (p < 0.05).Conclusion: Acupuncture may improve not only psychiatric symptoms but also physical symptoms and QoL in patients with treatment-resistant mood disorders. Further studies are required for confirmation of the preliminary data collected thus far.

  • Case Report2022-08-31

    Treatment of Lumbosacral Radiculopathy with Acupuncture and Medical Herbs: Four Case Reports

    Han Chae1, Yoona Oh2, Ji Won Choi2, Soo Kwang An1, Yeon Hak Kim2, Jun Hwan Lee4,5, Eunseok Kim2,3, Byung Ryul Lee2,3, Gi Young Yang2,3,*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 264-272 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.264
    Abstract

    Lumbosacral radiculopathy (LR) is a musculoskeletal disorder or pain syndrome that is generally linked to the compression or irritation of the nerve root. There is a growing interest in the development of efficient acupuncture-based treatments for LR comparable to western medicine. Structured traditional Korean medical treatments including intensified acupuncture stimulus on the EX-B2 point using the G-shaped posture modified from the sitting posture were applied to four LR patients, and the outcomes were evaluated based on objective clinical endpoints including a numeric rating scale (NRS), the Oswestry disability index (ODI), the manual muscle test (MMT), neurological symptoms, and plantar photography. Patients showed improvements in NRS, ODI, MMT, and neurological symptoms without adverse effects during hospitalization and follow-up visits. Moreover, we observed substantial dissolvement of hyperkeratinization and parchedness of the soles of the feet, which was not reported previously. These four cases demonstrate the clinical usefulness of traditional medicine and the diagnostic applicability of plantar photography. However, further randomized controlled trials are required to confirm our findings.

  • Review Article2022-08-31
    Abstract

    Currently, acupressure is widely accepted as a non-pharmacological therapy for managing pain, nausea and vomiting, and mental health conditions. Since acupressure can be self-administered, clinicians and researchers’ interest in information and communication technologies (ICTs) for disseminating acupressure to manage symptoms has increased. This mini review was conducted to examine clinical studies of acupressure using ICTs, with a particular focus on self-acupressure. Through a search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL, all studies of self-acupressure using ICTs published before December 31, 2021 were collected. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. More than half of the studies published since 2020 (4/7, 54.14%) were described as being related to COVID-19. As target conditions, musculoskeletal injuries or pain, cancer-related symptoms, dysmenorrhea, mental health issues, and obesity were considered. The most frequently used acupoints were LI4, LR3, and Shenmen. Moreover, smartphone applications were the most commonly used ICT method to support self-acupressure. In addition to the basic information of self-acupressure, other tools such as timers, reminders, and schedule checkers to facilitate its implementations have been incorporated into the smartphone applications. Recently, there have been some attempts to combine acupressure and ICTs. Although these studies mainly focus on musculoskeletal pain or injuries, recent studies related to mental health have emerged in relation to COVID-19. However, few studies have been conducted to date, making it difficult to fully grasp the trends in this field. Therefore, more studies are needed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of combining self-acupressure and ICTs in more diverse clinical areas.

  • Clinical Study Protocol2023-10-31

    Dry Needling for Arthrogenic Muscle Inhibition of Quadriceps Femoris in Patients after Reconstruction of Anterior Cruciate Ligament: a Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Milad Zarrin1,2, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari1,3,*, Soofia Naghdi1, Scott Hasson4, Bijan Forogh5, Mehdi Rezaee6
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(5): 193-202 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.5.193
    Abstract

    Background: Dry needling (DN) is recommended as a therapeutic modality for various neuromusculoskeletal disorders. No study has been performed on the impact of DN on arthrogenic muscle inhibition (AMI) after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). This study protocol is aimed to investigate the impacts of DN on AMI of quadriceps femoris, corticomotor, and spinal reflex excitability in patients with ACLR. Methods: A double-blind, between-subject, randomized, controlled trial will be conducted to measure changes in AMI after DN. Twenty-four subjects with ACLR will be recruited to receive a DN or a sham DN, providing that they met the inclusion criteria. Three sessions of DN on the quadriceps femoris will be applied during a one-week period. The primary outcome measures are the active motor threshold, motor evoked potential, and Hmax – Mmax ratio. The secondary outcomes are the International Knee Documentation Committee subjective knee form questionnaire score and maximum quadriceps isometric torque. Data will be collected at baseline, immediately after the first session, after the third session, and at the one-month follow-up visit. Discussion: The results of this study will provide preliminary evidence regarding the effects of DN on AMI of quadriceps femoris in patients with ACLR.

Journal Info

JOURNAL OF MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
Vol.17 No.3
June, 2024

pISSN 2005-2901
eISSN 2093-8152

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  • Perspective Article2022-08-31

    Correlation Between the Sinew Channels with the Myofascial System, Pathology, and Treatment

    Pablo Nava Jaimes*, Alejandro Martínez Reyes, Daniel García Lara, Abel Cristian Patiño Coyuca
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 201-213 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.201

    The sinew channels are a tendon and muscle network, and their description is based on the observation presented on the Huangdi Neijing Ling Shu. However, the myofascial system is an uninterrupted series of connective tissue that is comprised of layers that run in different directions. The similarities on these pathways are compared, such as a brief description on the myofascial pain syndrome and its similitude with the Impediment disorder from the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Furthermore, we discuss the treatment of these conditions from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective.

  • Brief Report2023-12-31

    Effect of Needling at Selected Acupuncture Points (GB39, BL17, LR13) on Hemoglobin Levels in Anemia: a Randomized Placebo Controlled Study

    K. Gayathri Devi1, A. Mooventhan1,2,*, N. Mangaiarkarasi1, N. Manavalan3
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(6): 263-267 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.6.263
    Abstract

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is an important public health issue in India. This study was performed to determine the impact of acupuncture at the GB39, BL17, and LR13 points on hemoglobin levels, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), and red cell distribution width (RDW) in people with IDA. One hundred women with IDA were randomly allocated to the acupuncture group (AG) or placebo control group (PCG). For 30 minutes per day, daily for 2 weeks, the AG received acupuncture at GB39, BL17, and LR13, while the PCG received needling at non-acupuncture points. Outcomes were assessed before and after the intervention. We found a significant increase (p < 0.001) in hemoglobin level (AG 10.39-11.38 g/dl, effect size 0.785; PCG 10.58-10.40 g/dl, effect size 0.191), MCH (AG 25.69-27.50 fl, effect size 0.418; PCG 27.43-27.23 fl, effect size 0.058), and RDW (AG 15.12-16.41 fl, effect size 0.626; PCG 14.91-14.94 fl, effect size 0.017) in the AG compared to the PCG. Results suggest that needling at the GB39, BL17, and LR13 acupuncture points is more effective in treating people with IDA than needling at non-acupuncture points.

  • Brief Report2022-12-31

    Acupuncture Treatment of a Patient with Bradycardia and Idioventricular Rhythm

    Oksana Strakhova*, Alexey Ryzhov*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(6): 356-360 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.6.356
    Abstract

    A patient with bradycardia and an idioventricular rhythm was observed. According to cardiologists, there is no reliable drug treatment for bradycardia with an idioventricular rhythm; instead, the sole treatment is a pacemaker. In the course of this case, it was shown that acupuncture can restore the heart rhythm from bradycardia to normocardia, and from idioventricular with third-degree atrioventricular node block and an average heart rate of 34 BPM, to normal sinus rhythm with a heart rate of 71 BPM. Additionally, at the end of the treatment, the patient’s number of episodes of ventricular extrasystole decreased 36 times (3289 versus 91 episodes). These results show that research on this technique should be continued.

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  • Perspective Article2022-08-31

    Correlation Between the Sinew Channels with the Myofascial System, Pathology, and Treatment

    Pablo Nava Jaimes*, Alejandro Martínez Reyes, Daniel García Lara, Abel Cristian Patiño Coyuca
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 201-213 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.201

    The sinew channels are a tendon and muscle network, and their description is based on the observation presented on the Huangdi Neijing Ling Shu. However, the myofascial system is an uninterrupted series of connective tissue that is comprised of layers that run in different directions. The similarities on these pathways are compared, such as a brief description on the myofascial pain syndrome and its similitude with the Impediment disorder from the Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Furthermore, we discuss the treatment of these conditions from a Traditional Chinese Medicine perspective.

  • Review Article2022-10-31

    Acupuncture for Osteoporosis: a Review of Its Clinical and Preclinical Studies

    Yimiao Tian1,†, Lili Wang2,†, Tianshu Xu1, Rui Li1, Ruyuan Zhu1, Beibei Chen1, Hao Zhang1, Bingke Xia1, Yiwen Che3, Dandan Zhao1,*, Dongwei Zhang1,*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(5): 281-299 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.5.281
    Abstract

    Acupuncture has gained growing attention in the management of osteoporosis (OP). However, a comprehensive review has not yet been conducted on the efficacy and challenges of acupuncture in preliminary research and clinical trials. Therefore, an extensive literature search was conducted using electronic databases, including PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed), CNKI (www.cnki.net), and Web of Science, for studies published from the beginning of 2000 to the end of May 2022. Combinations of synonyms for OP, acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, clinical trial, preclinical study, and animal experiments were searched. A total of 290 papers were consulted, including 115 reviews, 109 clinical observations, and 66 preclinical studies. There is accumulating evidence to support the beneficial role of acupuncture in preserving bone quality and relieving clinical symptoms based on clinical and preclinical investigations. The top ten most commonly used acupoints are BL23, ST36, BL20, BL11, CV4, GV4, SP 6, KI3, BL18, and GB39. The underlying mechanisms behind the benefits of acupuncture may be linked with the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (adrenal) axis and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin and OPG/RANKL/RANK signaling pathways. In summary, strong evidence may still come from prospective and well-designed clinical trials to shed light on the potential role of acupuncture in preserving bone loss. Future investigations are needed to explore the potential underlying mechanisms, long-term clinical efficacy, and compliance of acupuncture in OP management.

  • Review Article2023-12-31
    JAMS

    Acupuncture in Sports Medicine

    George G.A. Pujalte1,2,*, Michael Malone3, Akhil Mandavalli1, Davong David Phrathep4, Neil P. Shah5, Adam I. Perlman6
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(6): 239-247 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.6.239
    Abstract

    Acupuncture is gaining popularity and wider acceptance as a treatment modality within the field of sports medicine. Our objective was to provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature pertaining to acupuncture in sports medicine to shed light on approaches utilized in acupuncture while revealing its personalized nature and its impact on athletes’ preparation, performance, and recovery. We evaluated acupuncture research in the context of medicine and sports-related injury treatment, assessing its impact on athletic performance across demographics of athletes. Athletes participating in most sports have shown positive outcomes from acupuncture interventions. Acupuncture improves peak oxygen levels, maximum heart rate, delayed-onset muscle soreness, pain, swelling, explosive force production, and joint mobility. Furthermore, the efficacy of acupuncture appears to be similar regardless of age and sex. Lastly, the acceptance of acupuncture is influenced by cultural factors, with Western and traditional East Asian cultures exhibiting distinct perspectives on its rationale and mechanisms of action. Traditional East Asian acupuncturists typically employ qi and meridian theories in their acupuncture practices, with the recent incorporation of Western concepts. Acupuncture shows promise as an effective treatment for musculoskeletal pain and neuropathies in athletes across different age groups and for addressing injuries in various sports. Our comprehensive review will enhance our understanding of acupuncture’s potential as a complementary or distinct therapeutic approach compared to conventional therapies. Additionally, our review explores its specific applications within different sports and delves into the cultural dimensions involved in integrating this practice into modern sports medicine.

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