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  • Research Article2022-12-31

    Comparison of the Effects of Myofascial Meridian Stretching Exercises and Acupuncture in Patients with Low Back Pain

    Dilek Eker Büyükşireci1,*, Nesrin Demirsoy1, Setenay Mit2, Ersel Geçioğlu2, İlknur Onurlu1, Zafer Günendi1
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(6): 347-355 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.6.347
    Abstract

    Background: Acupuncture and myofascial meridians show great anatomical and clinical compatibility.Objectives: We aimed to compare the effects of myofascial meridian stretching exercises and acupuncture in patients with low back pain.Methods: We randomized 81 subjects with acute/subacute low back pain into three groups: an acupuncture (A) group, a myofascial meridian stretching (MMS) group, and a control (C) group. We recorded the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and Roland- Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ) scores at baseline and weeks two and six. We evaluated posterior pelvic tilt and transversus abdominis muscle strenghth with a pressure biofeedback unit, back extensor muscle strength by the Sorenson test, and lumbar range of motion (ROM) with an inclinometer. Group A received acupuncture (BL 57 and BL 62 acupoints) and stretching exercises according to the posterior superficial line were applied to the MMS group.Results: Improvements in the NRS score were more prominent in group A than in group C (p = 0.004). The RMQ score improvement between baseline and weeks two and six was more prominent in groups A and MMS (p < 0.001, p = 0.001, respectively). The Sorenson test showed significant improvement between the baseline and week two in groups A and MMS (p = 0.004, p < 0.001, respectively). The increase in lumbar ROM measurement in the MMS group between baseline and week two was significantly higher than in groups A and C (p = 0.009, p < 0.001, respectively).Conclusion: Stretching exercises according to the myofascial meridian system and acupuncture contributed to improved symptoms in the first two weeks in patients with acute/subacute low-back pain.

  • Review Article2022-10-31

    Acupuncture for Osteoporosis: a Review of Its Clinical and Preclinical Studies

    Yimiao Tian1,†, Lili Wang2,†, Tianshu Xu1, Rui Li1, Ruyuan Zhu1, Beibei Chen1, Hao Zhang1, Bingke Xia1, Yiwen Che3, Dandan Zhao1,*, Dongwei Zhang1,*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(5): 281-299 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.5.281
    Abstract

    Acupuncture has gained growing attention in the management of osteoporosis (OP). However, a comprehensive review has not yet been conducted on the efficacy and challenges of acupuncture in preliminary research and clinical trials. Therefore, an extensive literature search was conducted using electronic databases, including PubMed (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed), CNKI (www.cnki.net), and Web of Science, for studies published from the beginning of 2000 to the end of May 2022. Combinations of synonyms for OP, acupuncture, traditional Chinese medicine, clinical trial, preclinical study, and animal experiments were searched. A total of 290 papers were consulted, including 115 reviews, 109 clinical observations, and 66 preclinical studies. There is accumulating evidence to support the beneficial role of acupuncture in preserving bone quality and relieving clinical symptoms based on clinical and preclinical investigations. The top ten most commonly used acupoints are BL23, ST36, BL20, BL11, CV4, GV4, SP 6, KI3, BL18, and GB39. The underlying mechanisms behind the benefits of acupuncture may be linked with the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (adrenal) axis and activation of the Wnt/β-catenin and OPG/RANKL/RANK signaling pathways. In summary, strong evidence may still come from prospective and well-designed clinical trials to shed light on the potential role of acupuncture in preserving bone loss. Future investigations are needed to explore the potential underlying mechanisms, long-term clinical efficacy, and compliance of acupuncture in OP management.

  • Research Article2022-08-31

    Effects of Lidocaine Injection at Acupuncture Points on Perioperative Analgesia in Cats Undergoing Ovariohysterectomy

    Camila Menossi Sueza Lima, Camila Zanetti Segatto, Gustavo Ricci Zanelli, Gabriel Montoro Nicácio, Renata Navarro Cassu*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 255-263 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.255
    Abstract

    Background: Pharmacopuncture is an acupuncture-related technique that has been used to amplify the therapeutic effects of different medications.Objectives: To investigate the analgesic efficacy of a lidocaine injection at acupoints in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy.Methods: Thirty cats were randomly distributed into two groups (n = 15, per group). The experimental group received a bilateral administration of lidocaine at the following acupoints: Stomach 36 (ST-36) and Spleen 6 (SP-6) (Lido group). The control group did not receive lidocaine (Control group). All cats were sedated with dexmedetomidine and anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. Intraoperatively, fentanyl was given to control cardiovascular responses to surgical stimulation. Postoperative pain was assessed at various time points, up to 24 hours after extubation, using the UNESP-Botucatu multidimensional composite pain scale (MCPS) and Glasgow feline composite measure pain scale (CMPS-Feline). Sedation scores were measured at the same time points. Morphine/meloxicam was administered as rescue analgesia. Data were analyzed using t-tests, Fisher´s exact test, the Mann-Whitney test, and the Friedman test (p < 0.05).Results: Intraoperatively, more cats in the Control group required analgesic supplementation than those in the Lido group, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.65). Postoperative pain, sedation scores, and analgesic requirements did not differ between groups. Rescue analgesia was given to 67% (10/15) of the cats in each group.Conclusion: The administration of lidocaine at ST-36 and SP-6 acupuncture points did not provide significant perioperative analgesic benefits in healthy cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

  • Research Article2022-10-31

    Sedative Effect of Ketamin-Midazolam Administered at Acupoint GV20 Compared to Intramuscular Route in Blue-Fronted Amazon (Amazona aestiva): a Pilot Study

    Aricia Noelli Brega Monteiro1,*, Bruno Simões Sérgio Petri2, Haroldo Furuya2, Liliane Milanelo2, Márcia Valéria Rizzo Scognamillo3, Ayne Murata Hayashi4
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(5): 314-321 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.5.314
    Abstract

    Background: The growth of exotic pet medicine is leading to fast developments in clinical investigations on birds. Acupuncture, specifically pharmacopuncture, offers safe chemical restraint options.Objectives: To investigate pharmacopuncture at acupoint GV20 in blue-fronted Amazon parrots (Amazona aestiva) using ketamine and midazolam.Methods: Sixteen healthy birds were distributed into four groups (C: intramuscular control; 1/2 C: 1/2 dose intramuscular control; 1/2 GV20: 1/2 dose at acupoint GV20; 1/5 GV20: 1/5 dose at acupoint GV20). Degree of sedation, latency, recuperation time, heart and respiratory rate, and body temperature were measured. Quantitative data were analyzed by a Student’s t-test.Results: The C, 1/2 C, and 1/2 GV20 groups showed the same degree of sedation. The 1/2 GV20 group showed longer latency times (6 ± 2.1) than the 1/2 C (2.5 ± 0.5) group. Sedation time did not differ between the C (28 ± 9.8), 1/2 C (30.5 ± 8.6), and 1/2 GV20 (41 ± 22.24) groups. The 1/2 GV20 group recuperated faster (13.7 ± 3.7) than the C group (64.2 ± 3.5). The C and 1/2 C groups showed tremors and slow and unstable recovery. Two animals in the C group showed mild hypothermia (38°C).Conclusion: The use of 1/2 GV20 was effective and safe to sedate blue-fronted Amazon parrots without side effects, providing easy, stable, and fast recovery. The use of 1/5 GV20 had a shorter sedation time. These findings show that the combination of acupuncture and drugs provides new possibilities for efficient anesthetic protocols with fewer side effects in birds.

  • Abstract

    Background: Blood lipid levels have been reported as novel biomarkers for chronic subjective tinnitus (CST), with their levels being higher in patients with CST.Objectives: This trial aimed to determine the change in lipid profile and tinnitus-related quality of life (TR-QoL) responses to 8-week acupuncture treatment in patients with CST.Methods: Sixty obese patients with CST were randomly assigned to group A (treatment group; n = 30; mean age = 44.10 ± 3.69 years) or group B (sham group; n = 30; mean age = 45.53 ± 3.62 years). Patients in group A (n = 30) received manual stimulation at the TE3, TE5, TE17, TE18, TE19, TE20, TE21, TE22, GB2, GB8, GB20, LI4, LI11, KI3, SP6, ST36, CV4, CV9, and CV12 acupoints through in-site acupuncture needles thrice weekly. Furthermore, the bilateral abdominal ST25 and GB28 acupoints were electrically stimulated through in-site acupuncture needles. Group B (n = 30) received the same acupuncture protocol as group A but the insertion of needles was a sham insertion. Anthropometrics such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), TR-QoL (assessed via tinnitus handicap inventory), blood lipid levels such as high-density lipoprotein (HDLs), low-density lipoprotein (LDLs), cholesterol (C), and triglycerides (TGs), and the visual analogue scale (VAS) score for tinnitus severity, were assessed prospectively.Results: Only group A showed significant within-group improvements. Except for HDLs, BMI, and WC, unpaired between-group comparisons showed significantly greater improvements in other outcome measures of all patients with tinnitus (TR-QoL, LDLs, TGs, C, and VAS) in group A than in group B.Conclusion: Safe acupuncture treatment not only improves anthropometrics and TR-QoL, but also helps resolve hyperlipidemia and reduces the severity of tinnitus in obese patients with CST.

  • Research Article2023-06-30

    Effect of Acupressure at PC6 on Nausea and Vomiting During Pregnancy: a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Melike Pündük Yılmaz1,*, Saadet Yazıcı2, İsmail Yılmaz3
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(3): 89-94 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.3.89
    Abstract

    Background: Nausea and vomiting are among the most common medical problems during pregnancy, affecting 80% of mothers.Objectives: This study was conducted as a randomized controlled experimental study to determine the effect of acupressure applied by a wristband to the pericardium 6 (PC6) point on nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.Methods: The study population consisted of 74 pregnant women between 6-14 weeks of gestation who were experiencing nausea and vomiting. The study data was collected with personal information from the Pregnancy-Unique Quantification of Emesis Scale (PUQE). Experimental and control groups were selected by a simple random method. The experimental group wore acupressure wristbands for one week, while the control group did not use any method to alleviate nausea and vomiting. One week later, the PUQE scale was applied to both groups.Results: The acupressure wristbands decreased the nausea and vomiting scores of the pregnant women in the experimental group without statistical significance but did not change the nausea and vomiting scores of the pregnant women in the control group.Conclusion: Acupressure wristbands can be used to prevent nausea and vomiting during pregnancy.

  • Research Article2023-10-31
    JAMS

    The Public Perceptions on Wet Cupping Therapy (Hijama) in Saudi Arabia

    Suhaib Ibrahim Alkhamaiseh1,2,*, Amjad H. Bazzari3, Abdel Hadi Al jafari1, Firas H. Bazzari1
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(5): 176-182 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.5.176
    Abstract

    Background: Wet cupping (Hijama), a form of alternative medicine, is widely practiced in Middle Eastern countries, especially Saudi Arabia. Although considerable effort has been put into increasing public awareness about the safe and proper practice of wet cupping, studies on the attitudes, knowledge, and awareness levels of the Saudi Arabian public are lacking.Objectives: This study evaluated public attitudes toward the effectiveness, safety, and expected standards of practicing wet cupping. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted using an online questionnaire and involved 909 complete responses. The respondents were Saudi adults with a mean age of 30.43 ± 11.4 years (males: 42.1%, females: 57.9%). Results: The study revealed that most participants believed that although wet cupping is a beneficial (84.6%), well-known form of alternative medicine (82.4%) without harmful side effects (63.9%), it is not suitable for treating all diseases (72.3%) or everyone (66.8%). Most participants prefer wet cupping to be done at specialized centers (84.6%) by practitioners with confirmed qualifications (88.6%) using valid and sterile instruments (88.9%). The main demographic factor influencing participant responses was age, which was associated with more positive perceptions. Female, single, college-educated, and middle-aged respondents had more cautious attitudes. Conclusion: Our results indicate that Saudis support the use of wet cupping as an alternative medicine for select diseases and that individuals have adequate awareness of the practice’s safety standards to avoid potential risks.

  • Perspective Article2022-12-31
    JAMS

    Sham Acupuncture Is Not Just a Placebo

    Tae-Hun Kim1,*, Myeong Soo Lee2, Hyangsook Lee3
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(6): 333-335 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.6.333
    Abstract

    Sham acupuncture should have two distinct features: first, it must be morphologically similar to verum acupuncture for blinding purposes, and second, it must not exert physiologically expected effects of verum acupuncture. While several types of sham acupuncture are currently used, there are on-going debates on which sham acupuncture can meet the criteria for being an appropriate control intervention in acupuncture research. In view of this situation, it is unreasonable to regard the use of sham acupuncture in acupuncture research as the same as the use of placebo drugs in drug research. Given the current research evidence that sham acupuncture can exert not only the originally expected non-specific effects but also sham acupuncture-specific effects, it would be misleading to simply regard sham acupuncture as the same as placebo. Therefore, researchers should be cautious when using the term sham acupuncture in clinical investigations.

  • Research Article2023-08-31

    Effect of Acupressure on Pain during Inferior Alveolar Nerve Block Injection in Children Aged 5-10 Years Old - An Experimental Study

    Ayushi Shashikant Gurharikar, Devendra Nagpal*, Prabhat Singh Yadav, Purva Chaudhari, Kavita Hotwani, Gagandeep Lamba
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(4): 127-132 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.4.127
    Abstract

    Background: Acupressure, which is related to acupuncture, is a noninvasive therapy suitable for use in children. However, data examining acupressure’s effects on the pain of local anesthetic injection in children are sparse.Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate acupressure’s effects on the pain of local anesthetic injection in children.Methods: This randomized, double-blind, parallel-group clinical study included 37 5- to 10-year-olds who had an inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB) for a mandibular extraction and were randomized to one of two groups: acupressure (study group) or non-acupressure (control group). The Wong-Baker FACES Pain Rating Scale (WBFPS) and the Sound, Eye, Motor (SEM) scale were utilized for subjective and objective pain assessment during injection.Results: The objective and subjective assessment of pain during injection significantly differed between the groups, with the acupressure group displaying lower scores.Conclusion: Acupressure at the extra one point (EX-HN1) reduced pain during IANB injection in 5- to 10-year-olds and can be used as an adjunct to conventional measures like topical anesthesia to reduce pain.

  • Research Article2022-08-31

    The Adjunctive Effects of Acupuncture for Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients: a Single-Blinded Randomized Clinical Study

    Dwi Rachma Helianthi1, Atikah C. Barasila1,2, Salim Harris3, Robert Sinto4, Yordan Khaedir2, Irman1,*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 247-254 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.247
    Abstract

    Background: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an infectious disease caused by a coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that can induce cytokine storm. To this point, no specific drug has been effective for curing COVID-19.Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a combination of acupuncture intervention and pharmacologic treatment in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with mild-moderate symptoms.Methods: A single-blinded randomized controlled clinical trial of hospitalized COVID-19 patients confirmed by RT-PCR examination with mild-moderate symptoms was conducted from August to September 2020. Participants were assigned to the treatment group (receiving pharmacologic treatment and manual acupuncture intervention) or the control group (receiving only pharmacologic treatment). Laboratory outcomes, including complete blood count, C-reactive protein (CRP) and ferritin levels, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), were measured before and after the intervention. For clinical outcomes, we evaluated the duration of the cough symptom.Results: We found that participants in the treatment group had a shorter duration of the cough symptom compared to the control group, and the difference was statistically significant. In the treatment group, we found an increase in the percentage of lymphocyte count and ESR, while in the control group, both parameters were decreased; however, the differences were not statistically significant. There was a decrease in the mean of CRP and ferritin levels in both groups, and the differences were not statistically significant.Conclusion: Our study has shown promising results for the effects of combined treatment of acupuncture and pharmacologic treatment on the duration of the cough symptom in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with mild-moderate symptoms. Further large-scale studies with rigorous design are needed to examine these preliminary results.

Journal Info

JOURNAL OF MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY
Vol.17 No.3
June, 2024

pISSN 2005-2901
eISSN 2093-8152

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  • Research Article2022-08-31

    Effects of Acupuncture in the Treatment of Dogs with Neurological Sequels of Distemper Virus

    Bianca P. C. R. Santos1, Jean G. F. Joaquim2, Renata Navarro Cassu3,*, José C. F. Pantoja1, Stelio Pacca Loureiro Luna1
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(4): 238-246 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.4.238
    Abstract

    Background: Acupuncture (AP) has been empirically used to relieve post-canine distemper virus (CDV) infection neurological signs in veterinary clinics.Objectives: This clinical study aimed to investigate the effects of AP combined with electroacupuncture (EA) on neurological function in dogs infected by CDV.Methods: Twenty-four CDV-infected dogs with neurological sequelae were recruited to receive weekly AP/EA sections for 24 weeks. Neurological improvements were assessed before each AP/EA session using a modified scoring system. Data were analyzed using the McNemar test, Friedman test, Fisher's exact test, and Kaplan-Meier curves (p < 0.05).Results: Neurological scores improved from seven to 24 weeks after AP/EA treatment compared with pretreatment scores (p < 0.001). Significant improvements were recorded over time for functional limb recovery, cranial nerve deficits, mental status (p = 0.025 – 0.014), and urinary function (p < 0.001). Myoclonus was improved and entirely reversed in 75% and 25% of the dogs, respectively. At the end of treatment, the proportion of dogs with normal proprioception, posture, hopping (p < 0.001), and superficial pain sensation responses (p = 0.004) was greater than pretreatment values.Conclusion: AP/EA therapy promoted significant neurological recovery in CDV-infected dogs and may be considered within the chronic phase of the disease to improve motor and sensory rehabilitation. However, these results are preliminary and must be confirmed by further investigations.

  • Review Article2023-12-31
    JAMS

    Acupuncture in Sports Medicine

    George G.A. Pujalte1,2,*, Michael Malone3, Akhil Mandavalli1, Davong David Phrathep4, Neil P. Shah5, Adam I. Perlman6
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(6): 239-247 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.6.239
    Abstract

    Acupuncture is gaining popularity and wider acceptance as a treatment modality within the field of sports medicine. Our objective was to provide a comprehensive review of the existing literature pertaining to acupuncture in sports medicine to shed light on approaches utilized in acupuncture while revealing its personalized nature and its impact on athletes’ preparation, performance, and recovery. We evaluated acupuncture research in the context of medicine and sports-related injury treatment, assessing its impact on athletic performance across demographics of athletes. Athletes participating in most sports have shown positive outcomes from acupuncture interventions. Acupuncture improves peak oxygen levels, maximum heart rate, delayed-onset muscle soreness, pain, swelling, explosive force production, and joint mobility. Furthermore, the efficacy of acupuncture appears to be similar regardless of age and sex. Lastly, the acceptance of acupuncture is influenced by cultural factors, with Western and traditional East Asian cultures exhibiting distinct perspectives on its rationale and mechanisms of action. Traditional East Asian acupuncturists typically employ qi and meridian theories in their acupuncture practices, with the recent incorporation of Western concepts. Acupuncture shows promise as an effective treatment for musculoskeletal pain and neuropathies in athletes across different age groups and for addressing injuries in various sports. Our comprehensive review will enhance our understanding of acupuncture’s potential as a complementary or distinct therapeutic approach compared to conventional therapies. Additionally, our review explores its specific applications within different sports and delves into the cultural dimensions involved in integrating this practice into modern sports medicine.

  • Case Report2023-04-30

    Integrative Strategy with Ayurveda and Electro-Acupuncture in Hemifacial Spasm: a Case Report

    Akshatha K Bhat1,*, Venugopalan Krishna kumar2, Jim Daniel Johnson3
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(2): 65-69 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.2.65
    Abstract

    We report a primary hemifacial spasm that started four years ago with sudden twitching of the face towards the right side. It was diagnosed as a hemifacial spasm by a neurologist and prescribed with Zeptol 100 mg 0.5 tablet BID for two weeks, followed by two sittings of Botox injection in a gap of 1 year. A year later, it reappeared more severely, driving her towards an integrative treatment modality. Ayurveda treatments including Nasya, Ksheera dhooma, internal medications, and Rasona navaneetha prayoga were administered. GV20, GB14, EX-HN5, ST3, ST4, ST6, TE17, LI4, and GB34 were selected for electro-acupuncture. The scores of hemifacial spasm grading and quality of life scale were 9 and 20 (before), 6 and 16 (after treatment), and 4 and 10 (follow-up after six months), respectively. This integrative approach was safe and has shown an improvement in hemifacial spasm.

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  • Research Article2022-12-31

    Comparison of the Effects of Myofascial Meridian Stretching Exercises and Acupuncture in Patients with Low Back Pain

    Dilek Eker Büyükşireci1,*, Nesrin Demirsoy1, Setenay Mit2, Ersel Geçioğlu2, İlknur Onurlu1, Zafer Günendi1
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(6): 347-355 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.6.347
    Abstract

    Background: Acupuncture and myofascial meridians show great anatomical and clinical compatibility.Objectives: We aimed to compare the effects of myofascial meridian stretching exercises and acupuncture in patients with low back pain.Methods: We randomized 81 subjects with acute/subacute low back pain into three groups: an acupuncture (A) group, a myofascial meridian stretching (MMS) group, and a control (C) group. We recorded the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) and Roland- Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ) scores at baseline and weeks two and six. We evaluated posterior pelvic tilt and transversus abdominis muscle strenghth with a pressure biofeedback unit, back extensor muscle strength by the Sorenson test, and lumbar range of motion (ROM) with an inclinometer. Group A received acupuncture (BL 57 and BL 62 acupoints) and stretching exercises according to the posterior superficial line were applied to the MMS group.Results: Improvements in the NRS score were more prominent in group A than in group C (p = 0.004). The RMQ score improvement between baseline and weeks two and six was more prominent in groups A and MMS (p < 0.001, p = 0.001, respectively). The Sorenson test showed significant improvement between the baseline and week two in groups A and MMS (p = 0.004, p < 0.001, respectively). The increase in lumbar ROM measurement in the MMS group between baseline and week two was significantly higher than in groups A and C (p = 0.009, p < 0.001, respectively).Conclusion: Stretching exercises according to the myofascial meridian system and acupuncture contributed to improved symptoms in the first two weeks in patients with acute/subacute low-back pain.

  • Research Article2022-10-31

    Effect of Acupressure on Dental Anxiety in Children: a Pilot Study for a Randomized Clinical Trial

    Maria Eliza Consolação Soares1,*, Alessandra de Souza Araújo1, Isabela Carvalhaes Lagares Pinto1, Luiza Silveira Araújo Barbosa1, Maria Cristina Borsatto2, Rodrigo Galo3
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2022; 15(5): 307-313 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2022.15.5.307
    Abstract

    Background: Anxiety is an important problem in children in dental clinics. Acupressure may be a useful tool to assist in dental procedures in anxious children.Objectives: This pilot study was performed to examine the effects of acupressure on dental anxiety in children undergoing restorative procedures.Methods: Fourteen children aged 7-10 years and with at least one primary molar with caries on the dentine were included in the study. The participants also needed to score at least one point on the modified Venham Picture Test (VPTm) for the determination of anxiety. The children were randomly allocated to two groups: group A — non-documented points for the reduction of anxiety and induction of relaxation; group B — documented points (EX-HN3, Shen Men of auricular acupuncture). The anxiety scale was administered on three occasions: prior to the application of acupressure; immediately after sitting in the dental chair to undergo restorative treatment; and after removal of acupressure at the end of the restorative procedure. Heart rate (HR) was measured when each child sat in the dental chair, after the removal of carious tissue, and after the removal of acupressure.Results: After the procedure, HR (as an indicator of anxiety) was statistically significantly lower in group B than group A (p = 0.02). However, there was no significant difference between the groups regarding anxiety before and during the restorative procedure (VPTm and HR: p > 0.05).Conclusion: The children who received acupressure on documented points for the reduction of anxiety had a significantly lower HR after the restorative procedure. No significant between-group difference was found regarding anxiety measured using a psychometric evaluation (VPTm).

  • Research Article2023-06-30

    Ziwuliuzhu Acupuncture Modulates Clock mRNA, Bmal1 mRNA and Melatonin in Insomnia Rats

    Ao Huang1, Gefang Xiao2, Yiliu Chen1, Zuying Hu1, Pin-Hsuan Lee1, Yusen Huang1, Zifeng Zhuang1, Yuling Zhang1, Peng Qing2,*, Canghuan Zhao2,*
    J Acupunct Meridian Stud 2023; 16(3): 109-118 https://doi.org/10.51507/j.jams.2023.16.3.109
    Abstract

    Background: In clinics, Ziwuliuzhu acupuncture is widely considered an effective method of treating insomnia; however, there is currently limited information available regarding its possible mechanisms. Although the method of Ziwuliuzhu acupuncture possesses a unique rhythmic pattern.Objectives: In this study, we have creatively combined the traditional Chinese medicine of Ziwuliuzhu with a modern biological rhythm to investigate the internal mechanism of insomnia.Methods: Pathological tissue from the hypothalamus was analyzed using hematoxylin–eosin staining. The level of TNF (tumor necrosis factor)-α in the SCN (suprachiasmatic nucleus) area of the hypothalamus was detected in situ using the TUNEL fluorescence staining assay. The concentration of hypothalamic melatonin was detected using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The mRNA expression of Clock and Bmal1 was measured using RT-qPCR.Results: In the Ziwuliuzhu acupuncture groups, the structural damage in the hypothalamic neurons was alleviated compared to the model group and the expression of inflammatory factors was reduced. The mRNA expression levels of Clock and Bmal1 were significantly increased (p < 0.05). The concentration of melatonin was significantly increased (p < 0.001). Although there were no significant differences between the treatment groups (diazepam group, Nazi group, Najia group, and routine group) (p > 0.05).Conclusion: Ziwuliuzhu acupuncture alleviated neuronal damage and modulated the inflammatory reaction in the hypothalamus of rats with insomnia. Moreover, Ziwuliuzhu acupuncture increased the expression levels of Clock and Bmal1 mRNA, and MT content. This study has potentially highlighted one of the mechanisms through which Ziwuliuzhu acupuncture can be used to treat insomnia.

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